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Triple Trouble: Blacklolita, Oshirijima And Ryuki Miyamoto Team Up For #LΛNCHR EP

Hashtags in album titles? What a world, I tell ya.

Via Trekkie Trax, the trio of Blacklolita, Oshirijima and Ryuki Miyamoto have teamed up for #LΛNCHR, a high-energy set that starts off with each contributor sharing a solo number. Those veer towards the uptempo sort of track one would expect from a Trekkie Trax release, though all three manage solid drama out of the build-drop format — Miyamoto’s “Go Down” stands out, going from icy to chaotic, ushered in by a voice informing you “oh shit’s about to go down.” It’s solid, club-ready stuff, but the EP really gets going when the producers team up for songs, allowing them a chance to explore new sonic territory. Miyamoto and Blacklolita’s “Secret Weapon” takes the shard-like breakdown of a drop and plays around with it, making for a compelling (and heavy) listen. “Signal Stalker” and “Feel So Good,” meanwhile opt for lither, pitched-vocal numbers, with a few moments of release. Listen above, or get it here.

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New Izumi Makura: “Makura”

Whether this “Makura” is a proper introduction of sorts to Izumi Makura ahead of next month’s Identity album, or just a first-person number focused on a woman the Fukuoka rapper thought up, isn’t immediately clear. But either way, the song offers a reminder of what makes the mysterious, only-represented-by-cartoons artist so intriguing. Over a sparse but shifty beat, she raps and eventually sings come the hook, her voice being drenched in slight electronic effects, giving “Makura” a few moments of out-of-body-ness. Listen above.

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Lulu And Mavis Bacon Come Together To Form The Paradise Gym: Listen To “Matenrou”

Singer/songwriter Lulu and Trekkie-Trax-associate Mavis Bacon have come together to form a new group called The Paradise Gym. They already released an EP a couple months back, but now comes the sweet “Matenrou,” a song highlighting all the strengths of this project. Similar to her work with Mikeneko Homeless late last year, The Paradise Gym puts the focus on her voice, and plays up intimacy and closeness over floor-filling nuttiness. Mavis Bacon, fittingly, provides a piano-accented backdrop that lets Lulu shine. She delivers words that sound slightly defeated and melancholy, at times backing vocals tripping into her. Listen above.

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Happily Ever After: Ryota Mikami’s Wedding

You might not expect a ton of sonic consistency from an electronic album clocking in at around 17 minutes in length. In such a tight space, you’d think got a wow them with a bunch of sounds! Tokyo’s Ryota Mikami opts for a different — and ultimately, more satisfying — path across Wedding’s seven songs. The producer connects these tracks — which range from the harp-accented prayer that is “She Was Singing As If She Were In Love” to the minimalist percussion flex of “Pyre” — by frequently using a synth line that sounds like a choir of cat-like angels singing towards the heavens, alongside dramatic electronic keyboard melodies popping up on nearly every song here. It lends Wedding the feeling of one continuous number rather than a set of songs, which ultimately works in its favor. Get it here, or listen above.

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New De De Mouse: “Remember Night”

Producer De De Mouse’s signature sound is sliced-up vocals, the long-running artist taking split-second cuts of singing and turning them into syllabic candy. He’s just released a new EP, the Summer Twilight set, and this season he’s getting into the festival spirit. “Remember Night” is the opening number on the album, and De De Mouse splices up the sound of traditional festival singing, placing it against an electronic bounce. Similar to Omodaka, he’s using contemporary sounds (and techniques that are not particularly human) to create something that sounds very traditional…without being a historical recreation. Listen above.

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