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New Pop-Office: “RGN”

Even a little bit of new Pop-Office is better than no Pop-Office at all. “RGN” is a short but welcome blast from the Nagoya outfit, a fuzzy-around-the-edges rock number with vocals sung just underneath it all, in an uneasy monotone. It’s fast, but wastes no time in unloading everything it needs to and leaving you wanting for more from one of Japan’s better indie-rock outfits of the last few years. Listen above.

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New Magical Mistakes: “Annihilated”

Not to be the “my minor dental procedure!” guy, but basically being confined to your home following teeth extraction can get you loopy. I have been living off of yogurt and milkshakes, and have mostly been sleeping and/or watching YouTube videos all while trying to ignore a minor but irritating pain in the left-side of my mouth (which looks like I have a billiard ball crammed inside it). One of the bigger annoyances about this is I’m in such a scrambled zone I only want to hear music that washes over me — no words, or at least nothing I have to think about (sorry VIEWS).

Well thank goodness Magical Mistakes shared a new song, “Annihilated,” recently that is just right for this mindset. It opens with clock ticks, and from there bounces around, slowly blooming open and washing over the listener. It’s not relaxing per se — tension exists just beneath the surface, the first half of the song in particular sounding woozy before becoming a bit more concrete in the back half — but it’s very easy to get lost in. Especially when you are on pain pill eight of 10. Listen above.

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New Looprider: “Mustafar”

Looprider have a new album, Ascension, out today, and to get you in the mood for it, take a listen to “Mustafar.” Whereas the first song they shared ahead of last year’s My Electric Fantasy was a shoegaze-leaning cut, Looprider aren’t holding anything back here, as “Mustafar” is a quick and loud number, with screams covered in guitar, the whole thing wonderfully disjointed. If you need a sonic representation of screaming to relive stress in an empty apartment, well this is a solid option. Listen above.

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New TOYOMU: Mysterious Japanese Groove

Kyoto producer Toyomu (stylized TOYOMU) had quite the April, huh? His imagined take on The Life Of Pablo got his name all over English-language media, resulting in…well, just so many posts about him, or interviewing him, or vaguely focused around him. Now comes his next set of songs, Mysterious Japanese Groove, which shifts his sample sources to Japanese music from the ’70s and ’80s. Never fear, as Toyomu has not made a future funk album. Rather, he’s flipped these sounds into something all his own and displays his producer chops– which he also did on Pablo, though I feel that was overlooked a bit. Beats, such as the spacey fizz of “Chalk” and the nostalgic Boards-Of-Canada-ish “Gogo,” are absorbing spaces all their own, able to stand without any additional voices in the mix. Listen above, or get it here.

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New Homecomings: “Don’t Worry Boys”

Homecomings new album comes out next week, and it’s a good collection of melancholy indie-pop done very well. “Don’t Worry Boys” is one of the more upbeat songs from Sale Of Broken Dreams, and now has its own music video, which you can watch above. For all the swagger the Kyoto quartet bring to the song, they still work in the vocal harmonizing that makes all of their music — regardless of the mood — so sticky. Listen above.

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